The Ferryman

Lyrics and music: Pete St. John
Arrangement: Lorenzo Testa

One of many great songs by Dublin songwriter Pete St John, “The Ferryman” is about the closure of the Liffey Ferry service on October 1984, the loss of jobs and the end of a 320 years-old tradition… perfectly picturing how Dublin was changing during the ‘70s and ‘80s.
Despite the sad topic, the lyrics end with a positive note so we chose to rearrange it in a bluegrass-ish way that fits the hopeful mood.

Oh the little boats are gone
From the breast of Anna Liffey
And the ferrymen are stranded on the Quay
Sure the Dublin Docks are dyin’
And a way of life is gone
And Molly ‘twas part of you and me

Where the strawberry beds sweep down to the Liffey
You kiss away the worries from my brow
I love you well today and I’ll love you more tomorrow
If you’ve ever loved me Molly love me now

‘Twas the only job I knew
It was hard but never lonely
The Liffey ferry made a man of me
Now it’s gone without a whisper
Half forgotten even now
Sure, it’s over, Molly, over
Can’t you see

Where the strawberry beds sweep down to the Liffey
You kiss away the worries from my brow
I love you well today and I’ll love you more tomorrow
If you’ve ever loved me Molly love me now

Now I’ll tend the yard
And I’ll spend my days in talkin’
And I’ll hear them whisper – Charlie’s on the dole
But Molly we’re still livin’
And darlin’ we’re still young
And the River never owned me heart and soul